metahaven
Studio for Design and Research
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metahaven.net
metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Black Transparency, Metahaven
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Rejected PRINT cover ca. 2011—featuring Zizek & Gaga.
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Rejected PRINT cover ca. 2011—featuring Rebekah Brooks.
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The Sheikh Al-Skype is a mobile data center. Using the ungoverned spaces of “failed states,” this nomadic unit addresses possibilities for setting up temporary internet infrastructure beyond the critical borders of the international system.
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The search is on for critical borders… where non-compliant life is possible once again. The search is on for physical shelters… a castle, a ship, a mountain lair. We are weaponizing the dark glamour of new clouds. The Large Data Collider (LDC) is a circular-shaped data center modelled after CERN’s particle accelerator located under the Swiss-French border. The LDC is located in the Finnmark-Murmansk region in the upper tip of northern Europe, on the border between Russia and Norway. Inherent to the particle accelerator’s rotating movement, the data hosted in the LDC is never located within reach of any single sovereign, making use of both countries’ contrasting internet regulatory regimes.
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The search is on for critical borders… where non-compliant life is possible once again. The search is on for physical shelters… a castle, a ship, a mountain lair. We are weaponizing the dark glamour of new clouds. The Large Data Collider (LDC) is a circular-shaped data center modelled after CERN’s particle accelerator located under the Swiss-French border. The LDC is located in the Finnmark-Murmansk region in the upper tip of northern Europe, on the border between Russia and Norway. Inherent to the particle accelerator’s rotating movement, the data hosted in the LDC is never located within reach of any single sovereign, making use of both countries’ contrasting internet regulatory regimes.
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“Connecting the Dots: Keith Alexander” Before Edward Snowden gave thousands of the agency’s top-secret documents to the press, Alexander used to publicly appear in full military attire. Sometimes he tried to win sympathy by taking the stage in a black T-shirt. In Las Vegas in 2012, Alexander urged digital troublemakers to join the NSA; he also pleaded that his agency operated lawfully and transparently. “We are overseen by everybody,” he said.